A DUI Conviction in Illinois Can Cost Thousands of DollarsWhat is the cost of being convicted of Driving Under the Influence of alcohol or drugs in Illinois? Before you even consider the effect it will have on your criminal record and reputation, the money you lose after a DUI conviction is significant.

Each year, the Illinois Secretary of State’s Office puts out a DUI Fact Book. Included inside is a chart adding up the various fees and expenses that can result from a DUI conviction. The monetary amounts are only estimates that can vary depending on where you live, but they do give a sense of how the costs can accumulate.

Court Penalties

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Illinois lawmakers want to raise standard for felony theft convictionsIllinois has set a goal of reducing its prison population by 25 percent by 2025. One way experts have targeted to reach that goal is by reducing the number of theft convictions that qualify as felonies.

According to current Illinois law:

  • A first-time offense of theft of property (not from a person) valued at less than $500 is a Class A Misdemeanor, punishable by less than a year in prison and a fine of as much as $2,500. Any subsequent offense of less than $500 is a Class 4 Felony, punishable by one to three years in prison and a fine of as much as $25,000.
  • Any theft of property (not from a person) of $500 or more is a Class 3 Felony, punishable by two to five years in prison and a fine of as much as $25,000.
  • A first-time retail theft offense of a value less than $300 is a Class A Misdemeanor, punishable by less than a year in prison and a fine of as much as $2,500. Any subsequent offense of less than $300 is a Class 4 Felony, punishable by one to three years in prison and a fine of as much as $25,000.
  • Any retail theft offense of $300 or more is a Class 3 Felony, punishable by two to five years in prison and a fine of as much as $25,000.
  • Any retail theft offense that includes using the emergency exit on the property can increase the severity of the charges. A first-time offense of less than $300 can become a Class 4 Felony. An offense of $300 or more can become a Class 2 Felony, punishable by three to seven years in prison.

The Illinois State Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing said in a December 2016 report said the monetary threshold for a felony conviction is too low, causing too many non-violent offenders to be sentenced to prison.

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The Wrongs to Children ActThe 1961 Wrongs to Children Act makes it unlawful for minors under the age of 14 to partake in certain money-earning activities. The purpose of this law is to keep parents, custodians, and potential employers from mistreating young children and to cut down on child labor that is not in the child’s best interest. Throughout the industrial revolution, child labor was common in the U.S. It was not until the early 1900s, and particularly in the year of 1938, that labor committees began striving for laws that would protect children from child labor. The Fair Labor Standards Act was passed in 1938, which helped to end child labor and provide free, compulsory education for all children, according to the University of Iowa. As such, it is a Class A misdemeanor to violate the Illinois Wrongs to Children Act. A second offense is a Class 4 felony, which is punishable by three to six years in prison. A Class A misdemeanor is punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of $2,500.

Prohibited Actions Under The Act

As per Illinois statute 720 ILCS 150/0.01, it is unlawful to take, receive, hire, sell, apprentice, give away, employ, use, or exhibit a child under the age of 14 for the vocation, occupation, or service of the following activities:

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Illinois Criminal RegistriesIllinois has criminal registries for those who have been found guilty of murder or violence against a youth, making methamphetamine, and sex crimes. These databases keep track of offenders and are public record, meaning that anyone can look online to find out whether their neighbors have committed any of these offenses. While this seems like a good idea and is one that Illinois, more than many other states, has fully embraced, the success of such registry databases has been proven to be of little use. And, what’s more is that they may even detract from what they attempt to solve: convicts committing additional offenses.

Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Database and Registry Effects on Convicts

As per Illinois statute 730 ILCS 154/85, Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registration Act, those aged 17 years or more who are convicted of a violent crime against a person that is under the age of 18 shall be entered into the state’s database. Depending on the specific circumstances, the offenses include:

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Concealment of Death Vs. Concealment of a HomicideRecently, a former Algonquin, Illinois resident pled not guilty to a number of crimes, including murder and the concealment of a homicide, according to the Chicago Tribune. The trial is ongoing at this time of this writing. While murder is the most serious type of crime, and first-degree murder is the most severely punishable type of murder charge, concealment of a homicide is a very serious offense in and of itself. However, there is a difference between concealment of a homicide and concealment of a death.

Concealment of Death

The difference between concealment of death and concealment of a homicide is that concealment of death involves a death that did not occur by means of murder. According to Illinois statute 720 ILCS 5/9-3.5, concealment of death occurs when a person knowingly conceals the death of any other person who died by other than homicidal means.” Concealment of death is defined as more than simply withholding information. By concealing a death, the defendant is charged with allegedly performing an act to either prevent or delay the discovery of that death. Concealment of death is a class 4 felony, punishable by one to three years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000. Concealment of death occurs when a person:

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