St. Charles felony DUI defense lawyer

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is against the law in Illinois just as it is in every other U.S. state. If you are caught driving with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more in Illinois, you can be arrested and charged with driving under the influence (DUI). The criminal penalties associated with an Illinois DUI conviction will depend heavily on the circumstances of the offense. Some individuals who are convicted of a DUI may qualify for a diversion program and are able to avoid jail time entirely. Others, however, will face years of incarceration for a DUI conviction. Read on to learn more about Illinois DUI law and what you can do if you have been charged with this serious offense.

Misdemeanor DUI

If you are caught drinking and driving and you have never previously been convicted of DUI, you will likely face a Class A misdemeanor DUI charge. The penalties associated with a first-time DUI conviction include the revocation of your driver’s license for one year, a maximum jail sentence of six months, and a maximum fine of $1,000. You may be able to regain your driving privileges if you participate in the Monitoring Device Driving Permit program (MDDP) and install a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID) in your vehicle. A BAIID works like a breathalyzer and requires the driver to submit breath samples for blood alcohol content (BAC) analysis. A second DUI conviction is also a Class A misdemeanor, but it carries a mandatory minimum jail sentence of five days and a maximum sentence of one year.

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St. Charles DUI marijuana attorney

If you are like most people, you probably assume that driving under the influence (DUI) only refers to driving while intoxicated from alcohol use. However, this is not the only way that a person can be charged with DUI in Illinois. According to Illinois statutes, it is against the law to drive while under the influence of any drugs or alcohol. Even medical marijuana users or individuals taking prescription medications can be at risk of receiving a DUI if the drug hinders their ability to drive safely.

How Will the Legalization of Marijuana Affect Illinois DUI Laws?

Illinois will soon be the 11th U.S. state to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. House Bill 1438 was signed into law by Illinois Governor JB Pritzker in June 2019, and it will take effect on January 1, 2020. After this date, adults 21 years old or older will be able to legally purchase marijuana, THC-containing edibles, and cannabis concentrate products. However, it is critical for Illinois residents to understand that they are still subject to DUI laws regarding driving under the influence of cannabis even after legalization takes effect. Illinois law prohibits driving under the influence of “any drug or combination of drugs to a degree that renders the person incapable of safely driving.” If you are driving under the influence of marijuana and are stopped by a police officer, you could be arrested for DUI.

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St. Charles drug crimes defense attorney diversion program

The state of Illinois takes drug-related crimes very seriously. A person convicted of drug trafficking, drug possession, drug manufacturing and distribution, or another drug-related offense can face years or even decades of incarceration. Fortunately, Illinois law allows some drug offenders a certain amount of leniency if they participate in a diversion program. One of the diversion programs available to drug offenders is called 410 probation. The purpose of the 410 probation diversion program is to help drug offenders avoid a permanent criminal record and lead a law-abiding life after a drug-related arrest.

Who Can Participate in the 410 Probation Program?

Not everyone is eligible for a diversion program such as 410 probation. The court will consider a number of factors to determine whether or not a defendant qualifies for participation in a diversion program. These factors most often include the defendant’s past criminal record, any drug or alcohol addictions, his or her mental health, and the circumstances of his or her offense.

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St. Charles assault and battery defense attorney

Although we often hear the terms “assault” and “battery” together, these are two distinct criminal charges under Illinois law. Being convicted of assault and/or battery can lead to heavy fines, a permanent criminal record, and possible incarceration. Having a conviction for assault or battery on your record can seriously damage your professional opportunities as well as your personal reputation. If you or a loved one have been charged with assault, aggravated assault, or battery, make sure you fully understand the criminal charges being brought against you and how to defend against these serious charges.

What Is the Difference Between Assault and Battery?

The crimes of assault and battery often occur within the same incident or altercation. An assault is defined as behavior that reasonably puts another person in fear of harm, while battery involves the actual infliction of harm or injury. An individual can be charged with assault even if he or she does not physically touch the alleged victim in any way. For example, raising your hand in a way that makes the other person believe you are going to strike him or her can be considered assault. A great number of actions can be considered battery, including slapping, kicking, punching, spitting, and other provoking or insulting contact. You may be surprised to learn that a person does not need to suffer actual bodily harm or pain in order to be considered a victim of battery. Actions that are demeaning or intentionally inflammatory can constitute battery under Illinois law.

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St. Charles drunk driving defense lawyer

In Illinois, if you are convicted of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, your driver’s license can be suspended or revoked. However, there are several driving relief programs available to DUI offenders that can help them regain their driving privileges. A qualifying offender may be able to obtain a Monitoring Device Driving Permit (MDDP) or Restricted Driving Permit (RDP) by meeting certain criteria and agreeing to install a monitoring device in their vehicle. These devices, called Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Devices or BAIIDs, require the driver to submit a breath test in order to operate the vehicle. Here are some frequently asked questions Illinois drivers have about these devices:

How Do I Use a Breath Ignition Interlock Device?

Similar to a breathalyzer, a BAIID uses a person’s breath to estimate his or her blood alcohol content (BAC). If you have a BAIID installed in your car, you will need to breathe into the machine in order to start the vehicle. The device will then calculate your BAC. If your BAC is above the allowable limit, the vehicle will be “locked out,” and the ignition will be unusable for a period of time. You will need to submit additional breath samples every 5 to 45 minutes during your drive.

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