Archive, May 2015.

Homicide, murder, and manslaughter are familiar terms, and people often use them somewhat interchangeably to describe killing. But under Illinois law, they actually have different meanings, which can sometimes be confusing.In Illinois, the term “homicide” means the killing of another person. Murder and manslaughter are types of homicide. Depending on the circumstances, homicide may or may not be a crime. Homicides are considered justifiable if there was a reason to kill the other person, such as self-defense or defending another person. If the homicide was justifiable, it is not a crime. …
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Two new bills are progressing through Illinois’s state legislature that are designed to encourage inmates get education while incarcerated. One bill rewards educational achievements with sentence credit, while another makes it easier to get a criminal record sealed.Sentence Credit BillUnder House Bill 3884, an inmate who passed the GED test would be rewarded with 90 days of sentence credit, or time deducted from the prison sentence. The educational requirement must be completed while the inmate is incarcerated or while in pretrial detention. The bill would increase the days of credit from …
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Felony convictions have far-reaching consequences beyond incarceration, fines, or probation. One major problem is the effect that a conviction can have on employment opportunities. A new bill going through the Illinois legislature may ameliorate that problem for convicted felons. The bill would remove a lifetime ban on employment in schools for some people convicted of nonviolent felonies.The BillHouse Bill 494 is being sponsored by Rep. Kelly Cassidy, D-Chicago. The bill would mean that school districts could not automatically bar employment for a nonviolent felony conviction that was over …
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The protection of personal information is of utmost importance in today’s society, and so the violation of that privacy and misuse of personal identification information is a criminal offense. Beyond the basic offense of identity theft, Illinois law provides for several other offenses related to identity theft.Aggravated Identity Theft
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