Archive, August 2015.

The offense of disorderly conduct is broadly defined in Illinois, and charges can range from low-level misdemeanors to felonies. The purpose of the disorderly conduct statute is to maintain the public order and ensure that the public feels safe. While Illinois’s disorderly conduct statute covers many different offenses, from making bomb threats to peeping in windows to making false reports of domestic violence, the most common charges under the statute are for breaching the peace.
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Adolescents are notorious for making decisions that they later come to regret. Unfortunately, when those decisions have legal repercussions, regret and reformation may not result in the individual getting a clean slate. Criminal records from prior years as a misbehaving teenager can have severe personal and professional consequences, even for rehabilitated one-time offenders. A new law, effective this year, works to limit the negative effects of juvenile records in employment and education by requiring that, if the case meets certain guidelines, the records be expunged.
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Historically, in Illinois, a man could not be convicted of rape or other sex offenses if the victim was his wife. However, today, marital rape is a crime, and a person who forces unwanted sexual contact upon a spouse may be prosecuted.
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