Archive, October 2015.

 Law enforcement officers are essential to preserving law and order in the state, so Illinois has many laws designed to keep its police officers safe. Some of these laws make a victim’s status as a police officer an aggravating factor. This means that a person charged with, for example, battery will face a harsher sentence if the victim of the crime was a police officer performing his or her official duties.
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A bill has been signed into law by Gov. Bruce Rauner, amending Illinois’ concealed carry laws. Though the new law does not drastically change the impact of the Act, it does address important issues like privacy, mental illness, and interactions with law enforcement officers, which have the potential to affect a significant number of Illinois residents.
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In Illinois, speeding in construction zones or near schools can have serious consequences for drivers. A new bill, recently signed into law by Gov. Bruce Rauner, amends the Illinois Vehicle Code in regards to speeding and court supervision. The new law enhances penalties for violating these types of special speed limits, but in some circumstances, allows violators to complete a court supervision program in order to keep the violation off of their driving records.
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A bill has been signed into law by Gov. Bruce Rauner, designed to alleviate the problem of the inability to afford bail for those charged with certain nonviolent crimes. Often, defendants charged with crimes are eligible for release before their trial date, but cannot afford bail. This means that they stay in jail pending trial, which can be weeks or months away. Even though they have not been convicted of a crime, they suffer serious personal and economic troubles as a result of the incarceration.
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Consensual sexual activity with a child under the age of consent, which is generally age 17 in Illinois, has criminal consequences under the state’s statutory rape laws. If the sexual contact is made without consent, the crime is of course much more serious. Consensual sexual conduct is a crime because children are legally incapable of consenting to sexual activity, as they are generally not yet mature enough to fully understand what they are doing. Generally, under Illinois, the greater the age gap, the more severe the penalty.
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