Archive, February 2017.

Recently, a former Algonquin, Illinois resident pled not guilty to a number of crimes, including murder and the concealment of a homicide, according to the Chicago Tribune. The trial is ongoing at this time of this writing. While murder is the most serious type of crime, and first-degree murder is the most severely punishable type of murder charge, concealment of a homicide is a very serious offense in and of itself. However, there is a difference between concealment of a homicide and concealment of a death.
Continue reading

In the spring of 2016, a former Kenosha police officer pleaded guilty to felony charges stemming from planting evidence the year prior, according to Fox6Now. He had planted a bullet and ID card in the backpack of a murder suspect in 2014. The officer, who resigned in 2015, was charged with failing to perform known duty and misconduct in office. Fortunately, in this scenario, the officer was caught and his actions did not send an innocent person to prison, which is not always the case.
Continue reading

According to the Southern Illinoisan, lawmakers have pushed forward a bill that could make an act of violence toward a police officer, correctional officer, or emergency responder a hate crime, if it can be established that the crime was committed in order to terrorize or intimidate that person because of their protected status (of being a law enforcer or first responder). The bill is being co-sponsored by Southern Illinois Sens. Paul Schimpf and Dale Fowler as part of their campaign promises. If the bill becomes law, it could mean extra punishment for those who are charged with police …
Continue reading

Child abuse and child neglect are two entirely different types of offense, and while child abuse is typically a crime that is more heavily punished, child neglect can also end in a misdemeanor or felony charge, and a loss of parental rights. If you have been charged with child neglect, do not hesitate to contact an attorney at once.
Continue reading

While more attention is given to gun law violations, serious penalties are also given to those who violate Illinois’ other weapons laws. These banned weapons include stun guns and throwing stars, among others. Additionally, it is illegal to possess certain types of weapons depending on the property that you are on or even what you are wearing. If you have been charged with a weapons violation, you may be facing up to 30 years in prison if convicted of a class X felony. Weapons charges vary greatly on a variety of factors, however, and the charges you faced could well be dropped to a lower …
Continue reading