Archive, September 2018.

When you have been arrested and charged with a crime, you are typically facing numerous penalties. One of these might be having to pay restitution to the party harmed by your alleged actions. Restitution, like fines, can put you in a financially difficult position. To improve your chance of having your charge reduced or even dismissed, work with an experienced criminal defense lawyer.
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Driving under the influence (DUI) is not a uniform charge. Rather, there are many different factors that affect how a specific incident of alleged drunk driving is charged. These include the driver’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at the time of the arrest, his or her age, whether the driver has previous DUI charges on his or her record, and whether the drunk driving caused a victim to suffer an injury or death.
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Drunk driving is dangerous. That is why it is illegal. Like every other criminal offense, the penalties an individual faces for a DUI charge can change depending on the circumstances surrounding the incident. These are known as aggravating factors, and a DUI resulting in someone’s death is one of the most serious of these factors.
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When an adolescent under the age of 18 is accused of a criminal offense, he or she is typically tried as a juvenile. This means his or her case is handled by the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice (IDJJ). However, there are cases in which minors are tried as adults. Sometimes, this is because the charge is one of the offenses that require the defendant to be tried as an adult: first degree murder, aggravated criminal sexual assault, or aggravated battery with a firearm. In other cases, this is because the court has determined that it is appropriate to charge him or her as an adult.
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When you are charged with a criminal offense, your best course of action is to work with an experienced criminal defense lawyer to fight the charge. In some cases, however, going to jail is inevitable. This could be because the court has found you guilty of the crime beyond a reasonable doubt or because you accepted a plea bargain, which permits you to plead guilty to a lesser offense than your original charge.
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