Category Archives: Traffic Violations

Illinois school zone traffic violation attorney

With the school term in full swing, it is important for drivers to be aware of certain school zones located along their routes. Illinois has a law against speeding in school zones, and offenders may be penalized for traffic violations, including facing fines and possible jail time. It is imperative for drivers to be aware of the specific speed limits when driving near schools in order to avoid a traffic ticket or an accident.

Illinois Law Against Speeding in a School Zone

The state of Illinois mandates that school districts clearly mark where their school zones start and stop with the use of street signs and markings on the road. Often, schools also utilize a crossing guard to stop traffic for students who are crossing the road.

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St. Charles Scott's Law violation defense lawyer

So far this year, 16 Illinois State Police (ISP) troopers have been struck by moving vehicles while performing their duties. Three of them were killed, according to a report from FOX News. This is a result of motorists failing to move over for emergency vehicles. Illinois observes “Scott’s Law,” which was created after Trooper Scott Gillam was killed by a motorist who did not allow enough room while passing the illuminated police cruiser on the side of the highway. Violating this law is a traffic offense that is being taken more seriously now. Illinois State Police announced earlier this year that they would be utilizing hidden police vehicles to better apprehend Scott’s Law offenders and make the roads safer for emergency vehicles.

Who Does Scott’s Law Protect?

Originally, the law protected only police vehicles with their flashing lights illuminated, but in 2017 the law was updated to include all of the following vehicles:

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St. Charles speeding traffic violation attorney

In today’s society, everyone is busy, often juggling work, school, family, and social obligations. Being overcommitted can lead someone to drive from place to place in a hurry. However, speeding endangers everyone on the road and can lead to tickets for traffic violations. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in 2017, speeding killed 9,717 people, accounting for 26 percent of all traffic fatalities that year. Throughout the country, signs are posted along the roadway alerting drivers as to how fast they can drive. The speed limit has been set for a reason, and the only time drivers can exceed that limit is in emergency situations. Speed limits are put in place to protect the safety of everyone on the road. If they are not followed, a motorist can face serious penalties. 

Speed Limits Are Posted for Safety Reasons

All Illinois drivers are expected to know the speed limits for each type of road and obey the rules of the road while traveling. Speed limits vary depending on the location as shown below:

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St. Charles traffic violation defense lawyer

The number of cars that travel on roadways has been increasing for many years. Everyone has their own destination, and most people like to get there as quickly as possible. However, there should always be enough room between each car in case one driver needs to brake suddenly. Young drivers are taught the three-second rule in driver’s education classes. This rule states that there should be enough space between two cars in the same lane of the road that three seconds will pass before the following car reaches the position held by the car in front. Any motorist who follows closer than that is “tailgating” and thus committing a traffic violation.

Is Tailgating Considered Reckless Driving?

Reckless driving occurs when a person drives his or her vehicle with willful disregard for the safety of other drivers or pedestrians around him or her. One section of the Illinois law regarding reckless driving touches on the subject of following too closely. It says that a driver sharing the road must provide enough room for the cars around him or her to maneuver safely.

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St. Charles traffic violation defense lawyer

Young drivers--or those who have never been stopped by the police--can be overwhelmed the first time they go through a traffic stop. A lucky few may go their whole lives without being stopped, but when a traffic violation occurs, there is a risk of being pulled over. When an officer pulls you over in traffic stop, he or she is expected to clearly instruct you on how to proceed. The officer will ask for your driver’s license, registration, and proof of insurance. Depending on the reason for the stop, an officer may also ask you to exit the vehicle for a field sobriety test or for a search of the car. In Illinois, a police officer is within his or her rights to ask for your name and for an explanation as to why a violation was committed. However, while you are required to show your license and registration, you do not have to answer any questions or consent to your vehicle to be searched without a good reason.

What a Driver Should Do

If you see blue and red flashing lights in your rear-view mirror, pull over immediately, turn on your hazard lights, and put the car in park. Once stopped, the police officer will approach your car, identify him or herself, and ask to see the required identification. The officer can also ask certain questions, such as “Do you know how fast you were going?” However, you are protected by the Fifth Amendment and do not have to answer that query. The Fifth Amendment states that everyone has the right to not incriminate themselves by admitting to a crime, including a traffic violation.

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