Concealment of Death Vs. Concealment of a Homicide

Concealment of Death Vs. Concealment of a HomicideRecently, a former Algonquin, Illinois resident pled not guilty to a number of crimes, including murder and the concealment of a homicide, according to the Chicago Tribune. The trial is ongoing at this time of this writing. While murder is the most serious type of crime, and first-degree murder is the most severely punishable type of murder charge, concealment of a homicide is a very serious offense in and of itself. However, there is a difference between concealment of a homicide and concealment of a death.

Concealment of Death

The difference between concealment of death and concealment of a homicide is that concealment of death involves a death that did not occur by means of murder. According to Illinois statute 720 ILCS 5/9-3.5, concealment of death occurs when a person knowingly conceals the death of any other person who died by other than homicidal means.” Concealment of death is defined as more than simply withholding information. By concealing a death, the defendant is charged with allegedly performing an act to either prevent or delay the discovery of that death. Concealment of death is a class 4 felony, punishable by one to three years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000. Concealment of death occurs when a person:

  • Knowingly conceals (misleads or lies about the death); or
  • Knowingly moves the body of a dead person from the place that they died with the intent of concealing the person’s identity, how they died or the identity of another person who has information about the death.

Concealment of a Homicide

Concealment of a homicide is a greater crime than that of concealment of death. It is charged as a class 3 felony, which is punishable by two to five years in prison and a maximum fine of $25,000. Concealment of a homicide, according to statute 720 ILCS 5/9-3.4 is knowingly concealing a death when that person has knowledge that the death was caused by homicidal means. Concealing information regarding the murder, lying to authorities about said information, or moving a body can all be construed as concealing a homicide when that person knows that the death was caused by murder. A defendant can also be charged with first-degree murder, second-degree murder, or manslaughter in addition to concealment of a homicide, which are all even more serious crimes.

If You Have Been Charged With Any Crime, Contact a Skilled Attorney Today for Help

Concealment of a homicide and concealment of death are both grave crimes that can put even a first time offender away in prison for years. If you are facing charges for either of these felonies, we strongly urge you to contact our passionate Naperville criminal defense attorneys at Law Office of Glenn M. Sowa, LLC today to discuss your legal options.

Source:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/elgin-courier-news/news/ct-ecn-bartlett-murder-trial-st-0228-20170227-story.html

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