Tag Archives: criminal act

St. Charles theft defense attorney

In December 2018, a video titled “Package Thief vs. Glitter Bomb Trap” was posted on YouTube. The video, which has since garnered over 79 million views, shows unsuspecting individuals stealing packages from porches. Once they try to open them, the packages spray glitter all over the place and record their reactions through a built-in camera. As more and more people use online shopping and delivery, concerns about the theft of packages continue to increase. In Illinois, stealing a person’s mail is a major criminal offense with significant penalties. If you or someone you know has been accused of stealing a package from someone’s property, speak with a criminal defense attorney right away to learn about your legal options.  

Taking a Package May Result in Significant Jail Time

Law enforcement and legislators are becoming increasingly vigilant about package theft in the United States. According to one survey, about 30 percent of Americans have had at least one package stolen from their property. Theft of items valued at less than $500 is a Class A misdemeanor offense in Illinois. If convicted of misdemeanor theft, a person may be sentenced to jail for up to one year and required to pay a fine of up to $2,500, in addition to paying for losses caused by the theft. However, if the offender has a previous theft-related offense on his or her record, the charge may be elevated to a Class 4 felony, which is punishable by up to three years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000. If the value of the stolen items was between $500 and $10,000, this is a Class 3 felony offense punishable by two to five years in prison and a fine of up to $25,000, in addition to payment of restitution.

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Naperville criminal defense attorney, criminal actA Virginia college student was killed by a hammer in a recent track and field event, according to the BBC. However, the person who threw the hammer is not facing criminal charges. This begs the question, if a crime is not determinant solely on outcome, what else is at play?

For many crimes, in order for an individual to be found guilty, the prosecution must prove that the defendant was in a certain mental state during the criminal act. For example, if a grocery shopper went through the checkout line and paid for all of his or her items, except the groceries stored underneath in the bottom portion of the cart, and then walked the cart out without paying for those items, the defense could reason that a theft offense should not be charged because the act was unintentional.

An example of when a theft would likely succeed is if the shopper had lined his or her coat pockets, walked out the door without paying, and also proceeded to flee security outside the store in the parking lot. Intent would be much easier for the prosecution to prove in the latter scenario.

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