Tag Archives: criminal defense lawyer

St. Charles Defense Lawyer

With the advent of new technologies and our increased reliance on them, it is easier than ever for someone to get their hands on all kinds of personal information. Once an individual has access to a person’s name, address, phone number, social security number, or tax ID number, they can gain access to many personal records. 

Identity theft is not uncommon in the United States. In 2016, there were nearly 26 million victims of identity theft in the U.S, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Being charged with identity theft is a serious charge and can mean severe consequences if you are convicted.

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Naperville Stalking Lawyer

Regardless of your intent, you could commit a stalking offense under Illinois law. Sometimes stalking is a part of domestic violence charges, while other times it is a standalone charge. Stalking charges can affect every part of your life, from your career and living arrangements to your relationships with both family and friends. 

In this day and age, stalking can occur in many forms, which is why Illinois’ stalking law has been updated to reflect that.

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criminal defense lawyer, choosing a lawyer, criminal defense case, criminal defense strategy, criminal court caseWhen you are facing a criminal charge, one of the first things you should do is to start working with an experienced criminal defense lawyer. In your anxiety over the charge, it can be easy to just work with the first lawyer you meet, or the least expensive lawyer. But this can cost you in the long run in a lot of different ways. You could end up with a larger bill than you initially anticipated or a subpar defense strategy that leads to your conviction.

Shop around before you choose a lawyer to represent your case. Be on the lookout for red flags and use these to narrow down your list.

Any Guarantees About Your Case

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grant of immunity, Naperville criminal defense attorney, testify under oath, criminal activity, criminal defense lawyerAside from the right to a jury trial, perhaps no other constitutional guarantee is so well-known as one’s right to remain silent and refuse to answer questions from law enforcement regarding one’s potentially-criminal activities. The purpose of this protection is simple: to prevent you from involuntarily incriminating yourself and implicating yourself in criminal activity. While this right is nearly absolute, there is one way in which the prosecution and law enforcement can get you to talk: by granting you immunity.

Types of Immunity and Their Effects

A prosecutor can grant a defendant immunity in order to compel him or her to testify under oath in a hearing about matters that might otherwise implicate him or her in criminal activity. A prosecutor may grant the defendant transactional immunity: if he or she does so, then the defendant is protected from being prosecuted by any means in connection with the criminal activity about which the defendant will testify. Even if there is objective evidence that ties the defendant to the criminal activity, a grant of transactional immunity would prevent any further prosecution of the defendant for that matter.

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criminal background checks, employment screening, Illinois defense attorney,A new Illinois law that goes into effect on January 1, 2015, seeks to give people with a criminal background a fair chance at employment. The Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicants Act, signed into law by Governor Quinn on July 19, 2014, prohibits employers from asking most potential employees about their criminal history during the initial stages of a job application. The law applies to employers with 15 or more employees in the previous or current calendar year.

For people with criminal backgrounds, the question about their past convictions can often bar them from jobs they may be otherwise qualified for, and make it seem like their punishment will never end. Because of this, there has been a nationwide “ban the box” movement to limit employers’ questions into applicants past until later in the application process. This would stop employers from pre-screening applicants before applicants can show that they have the necessary skills to do the job.

How the Law Works

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