Tag Archives: felony convictions

Illinois DUI Lawyer

Most of the time in Illinois, a DUI is charged as a misdemeanor. If you are a first-time DUI offender and you are convicted, it is a Class A misdemeanor, which carries a maximum sentence of one year in prison and up to $2,500 in fines. Depending on your specific situation, a misdemeanor DUI charge could bump to a felony charge, which carries harsher penalties. Any DUI that is classified as a felony is called an aggravated DUI and can range from a Class 4 felony to a Class X felony.

Class 4 Felonies

While these are the lowest felony offenses, they are still serious charges. If you are convicted of a Class 4 felony, you can face one to three years in prison. Examples of Class 4 felonies as they pertain to DUI include:

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The Illinois Offender Initiative ProgramEven the most respected, honorable members of our community make mistakes. Sometimes, that mistake results in a violation of the law that leads to a felony. But not all defendants convicted on theft charges, for example, are given the same sentence. The court will decide punishment based on the criminal violation, circumstances surrounding the crime, the defendant’s prior criminal record, and other specifics. In some cases, only when the defendant has no prior criminal record, the charge may be dismissed and their record expunged. This is called the Offender Initiative Program. For an alternative to prison, contact us today to find out more.

For Some Felonies, Your Record May be Expunged

According to Illinois criminal code 730 ILCS 5/5-6-3.3, if you, the defendant, have not been on probation or charged with any of the following, you may be allowed to participate in the Offender Initiative Program, with consent from the State’s Attorney:

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Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer, Illinois criminal statutesFelony convictions have far-reaching consequences beyond incarceration, fines, or probation. One major problem is the effect that a conviction can have on employment opportunities. A new bill going through the Illinois legislature may ameliorate that problem for convicted felons. The bill would remove a lifetime ban on employment in schools for some people convicted of nonviolent felonies.

The Bill

House Bill 494 is being sponsored by Rep. Kelly Cassidy, D-Chicago. The bill would mean that school districts could not automatically bar employment for a nonviolent felony conviction that was over seven years old at the time of the application for employment. For nonviolent felonies less than seven years old, the state would not bar employment at schools. The bill would instead provide for local control of the issue, and school districts would be able to make their own rules for hiring. The seven-year waiting period would begin at the end of the sentence, whether involving jail time or probation.

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