Tag Archives: Naperville defense lawyer

Ilinois defense lawyer, Illinois criminal attorney, Illinois bills, Two new bills are progressing through Illinois’s state legislature that are designed to encourage inmates get education while incarcerated. One bill rewards educational achievements with sentence credit, while another makes it easier to get a criminal record sealed.

Sentence Credit Bill

Under House Bill 3884, an inmate who passed the GED test would be rewarded with 90 days of sentence credit, or time deducted from the prison sentence. The educational requirement must be completed while the inmate is incarcerated or while in pretrial detention. The bill would increase the days of credit from the 60 days allowed under the current law, and the credit could be added to any other credit earned from the other programs listed in the statute. It only applies to inmates who have not previously graduated from high school or gotten their GEDs.

...
Continue reading

drug crimesFacing drug charges is an extremely stressful ordeal. Although the situation may feel hopeless, there are several effective defenses against drug charges. Depending on your situation, a criminal attorney may be able to get the charges reduced or dropped entirely. This was the case in a recent story when a Chicago federal prosecutor dropped drug charges against 27 defendants.

The decision to drop the charges followed allegations that operatives in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) conducted drug sting operations that unfairly targeted minorities while involving other conspiratorial efforts. As the New York Times reports, this case attracted national attention and led to debates regarding racial profiling and entrapment.

The allegations concerned seven out of nine high-profile sting operations. In all but two cases, federal agents had seized large amounts of cocaine and weapons, and made several arrests.

...
Continue reading

Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal law, stealing, Not all theft-related crimes are created equal. At the most basic level, when a person takes something from another person without his or her permission with the intention to not return it, they can be charged with theft. There are several other ways by which a person can commit a theft in Illinois. If a person does certain other things in addition to simply taking something or trying to take something, they can be charged with either robbery or burglary. For some people, the difference between robbery and burglary may not be clear.

What is Burglary

A burglary has a lot to do with the location of the crime. Under Illinois law, a burglary occurs when a person knowingly enters a building, a boat, a car, or one of several other structures or parts of them, and remains there without permission and with the intention to commit a theft or another felony. Note that while a theft is explicitly mentioned in the statute, it is not the only qualifying crime that can turn entering into a building without permission into a burglary; any felony qualifies. For instance, if a person breaks into another person’s house without permission, with the intention of sexually assaulting the house owner, then the person breaking in may be charged with burglary.

...
Continue reading

Illinois criminal defense attorney, Illinois dedense lawyer, bail conditions, If you are charged with a criminal offense, you can be held in jail pending your trial unless a judge grants you bail, or you are released on your own recognizance. Without posting bail, you can be in jail for a long time waiting for trial. Whether or not you can be bailed out for an offense, and the amount you will be required to pay, is determined by a judge according to the law.

What is Bail?

 Bail is an amount of money that is required by a court in order to release an accused person pending trial for a criminal charge. Bail is refundable once the accused appears for trial, and if he or she does not appear, the money is forfeited to the government. If someone who is on bail fails to appear in court, the judge can issue a warrant for his or her arrest. The person would not be likely to get bail again in the same case, unless he or she can show that the failure to appear was not intentional. Although there is no constitutional right to bail, there is a constitutional prohibition against excessive bail, where bail is to be granted.

...
Continue reading

traffic stop, Illinois criminal defense attorney, police checkpoint, Getting stopped by the police may make some people nervous, even when they haven’t done anything wrong. In some cases, a police stop can be a quick encounter that takes minutes out of the day; in other cases, the stop could result in arrest. Whatever the reason for the stop, it is important to always know your rights as you encounter police officers.

Being Stopped by an Officer

There are two common situations in which the police can routinely stop you in an everyday situation: in a traffic stop and as you walk on the street. Police are allowed to stop you in both situations if they act in a reasonable manner, and can state a reason why they stopped you. In a traffic stop situation, the police can stop you if they see you commit a traffic violation, and will routinely ask you for your license and registration information. If the police stop you while you are walking in the street, they may ask you to identify yourself, and, in most cases, this is through asking for your I.D.

...
Continue reading

Archives