Tag Archives: new law

b2ap3_thumbnail_bail.jpgA bill has been signed into law by Gov. Bruce Rauner, designed to alleviate the problem of the inability to afford bail for those charged with certain nonviolent crimes. Often, defendants charged with crimes are eligible for release before their trial date, but cannot afford bail. This means that they stay in jail pending trial, which can be weeks or months away. Even though they have not been convicted of a crime, they suffer serious personal and economic troubles as a result of the incarceration.

Pilot Program

Senate Bill 202 creates a separate court for impoverished inmates charged with low-level shoplifting and trespassing offenses. If, within 30 days of bail being set, their cases are not resolved and they cannot afford bail, the sheriff can release them pending trial.

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Illinois defense attorney, Illinois criminal lawyer, Illinois criminal statutesFelony convictions have far-reaching consequences beyond incarceration, fines, or probation. One major problem is the effect that a conviction can have on employment opportunities. A new bill going through the Illinois legislature may ameliorate that problem for convicted felons. The bill would remove a lifetime ban on employment in schools for some people convicted of nonviolent felonies.

The Bill

House Bill 494 is being sponsored by Rep. Kelly Cassidy, D-Chicago. The bill would mean that school districts could not automatically bar employment for a nonviolent felony conviction that was over seven years old at the time of the application for employment. For nonviolent felonies less than seven years old, the state would not bar employment at schools. The bill would instead provide for local control of the issue, and school districts would be able to make their own rules for hiring. The seven-year waiting period would begin at the end of the sentence, whether involving jail time or probation.

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Illinois elections, Illinois criminal defense attorney, St. Charles defense lawyer, During the November 2014 elections, voters in Illinois were given the chance to vote on a state constitutional amendment to expand the current crime victim rights law. The initiative to amend the Illinois constitution to include the crime victims’ bill of rights passed by over 77 percent of votes cast.

Rights of Crime Victims in Illinois

Currently, Illinois law provides rights for crime victims and witnesses under the Rights of Crime Victims and Witnesses Act. This law defines crime victims to include people who have been physically injured or lost property due to another person committing a violent crime against them. It also includes a family member, such a spouse or child who is not the accused perpetrator of the crime, of a person who is killed as a result of a violent crime in Illinois or who is mentally or physically incapable of exercising the rights granted under the law.

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