St. Charles DUI Lawyer

In the state of Illinois, a DUI arrest is enough for the Secretary of State’s office to automatically suspend your driver’s license. If you fail a blood-alcohol chemical test, your license can be suspended for at least six months. If you refuse to take a blood-alcohol concentration test, your license may be suspended for at least one year. This suspension is called a statutory summary suspension and is separate from any suspensions or revocations that may result from a criminal trial.

Losing your driving privileges can be difficult, especially when you rely on your driver’s license to get to and from work or school, or to simply complete everyday tasks. Thankfully, Illinois has a few options for people who have had their driver’s license suspended or revoked. Both types of driving permits require the use and installation of a breath-alcohol ignition interlock device or BAIID.

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Naperville Traffic Ticket Lawyer

A society cannot thrive in safety without rules and regulations. When it comes to traffic laws, they exist for the sole purpose of keeping drivers, passengers, pedestrians, and all other people safe. The violation of traffic laws can lead to extremely dangerous situations, but when someone violates them while in a construction zone, it increases the potential danger.

According to the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), there were 6,741 work zone crashes nationwide in 2016. During those accidents, 765 people were killed and 1,893 injured. Illinois has some of the most strict construction zone traffic laws in the country, so it is important you understand what to do and not do. Here are a few things you need to know about Illinois construction zone traffic tickets:

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St. Charles

If you are convicted of a DUI, you can face severe penalties - expensive fines, jail time, and the loss of your driving privileges. In Illinois, you do not have to be convicted of DUI for the state to suspend your driver’s license. If you fail or refuse to submit to a breath or blood test of your blood-alcohol content, your driver’s license may automatically be suspended for at least six months. If you are a convicted first-time DUI offender, there is a minimum driver’s license revocation of one year. 

Getting your driver’s license back can be complicated, in part because you are required to attend a Secretary of State hearing before your privileges will be reinstated. There are two types of Secretary of State hearings: informal and formal. The hearing you are asked to attend depends on the circumstances surrounding your DUI. It is critical to know what hearing you must attend, as the requirements for both hearings are different.

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Illinois DUI Lawyer

Most of the time in Illinois, a DUI is charged as a misdemeanor. If you are a first-time DUI offender and you are convicted, it is a Class A misdemeanor, which carries a maximum sentence of one year in prison and up to $2,500 in fines. Depending on your specific situation, a misdemeanor DUI charge could bump to a felony charge, which carries harsher penalties. Any DUI that is classified as a felony is called an aggravated DUI and can range from a Class 4 felony to a Class X felony.

Class 4 Felonies

While these are the lowest felony offenses, they are still serious charges. If you are convicted of a Class 4 felony, you can face one to three years in prison. Examples of Class 4 felonies as they pertain to DUI include:

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St. Charles Defense Lawyer

With the advent of new technologies and our increased reliance on them, it is easier than ever for someone to get their hands on all kinds of personal information. Once an individual has access to a person’s name, address, phone number, social security number, or tax ID number, they can gain access to many personal records. 

Identity theft is not uncommon in the United States. In 2016, there were nearly 26 million victims of identity theft in the U.S, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Being charged with identity theft is a serious charge and can mean severe consequences if you are convicted.

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